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My theme for the exhibition is futuristic, hyperrealism.

For this exhibition, I would like to use works that have a futuristic feel. The three artists I chose have a consistent style that they share, Hyperrealism. Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high-resolution photograph. Richard Estes painting Times Square 2004 depicts New York City in a reflection. The use of strong reflections and highlight and shadow make you feel like you are in the city. This painting is an excellent example of a growing, industrialized city full of promise and future, all things that deal with the future.

Simon Hennesy’s On reflection 2011 is a painting that shows a futuristic clothing style. The glasses in the painting remind us of 3D glasses used in theatres or glasses seen in pop culture as a fad for the future.  This piece compliments my theme and the other pieces because it is a different aspect of the future, rather than just showing a bustling city, it shows how a person would look traveling in time.

Jason De Graaf’s piece makes us feel like we are travelling through time, or that we are viewing the future through marbles. The piece locks us in this futuristic moment with its highly reflective subject matter, dimmed color palette, and clean sterile mood.

All these pieces come together to make viewers think about what the future is, how it looks, and where it begins. This hyper realistic exhibition brings the future to our attention, allowing us to question what the future is, when it happens, and are we already the future. Because of how photographic the paintings look viewers are forced to confront the fact that they are the past, present, and most importantly, the future.

richard estes times square

Richard Estes – Times Square 2004

 

 

 

SONY DSC

Simon Hennesy – On Reflection (2011)

 

de graaf parallel lines that never meet
 

Jason De Graaf – Parallel Lines that Never Meet

 

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